5 Crucial Tips to Win a Reckless Driving Case

Reckless driving is a charge that can be very difficult to beat. The stakes are high, and it’s important not to take any chances with your reckless driving case. That being said, there are many ways that you can turn the odds in your favor and win a reckless driving case. In this blog post, we will discuss some of those strategies for winning a reckless driving case!

1) Obtain copies of the police reports and request that they are unsealed. The officer who pulled you over may have failed to include essential details in his report, or he may have made mistakes with identifying information when writing up your arrest record. If this is the case, this will make it much more difficult for them to prove their claim against you at trial!

2) Ask for a dismissal of the case. If you are being charged with reckless driving and there is no evidence to back up their claim, then they may dismiss your charge!

3) Do not plead guilty unless they offer a deal that is too good to pass up. This will be an uphill battle if you find yourself in this situation, so try not to end up here and avoid pleading guilty as much as possible!

4) Prepare for trial. You will have the most success fighting your charge if you are prepared to go to trial and fight for a dismissal of this case! This includes practicing with an attorney, becoming familiarized with the judge and prosecutor assigned to your court date, etc.

5) Always prepare yourself by having evidence on hand to prove their claim against you wrong at trial. For example, be sure that they can’t find any previous charges of reckless driving or excessive speeds and show them why those don’t apply in this situation so you won’t end up looking like a repeat offender!

If you follow all these tips and hire a skilled personal injury lawyer like Caffee Law Firm who can defend your case successfully, you can easily get rid of all the charges. So, start looking for a perfect lawyer for this purpose and prepare yourself as per his inputs.

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What’s the Definition of a Serious Injury?

I need some help on, maybe I can call it, a definition. You see, my mom was in a car accident. A bad one. She got pinned in for a while. The other guy hit her in the intersection. Typical jerk running a red light, thinking wherever he was going and whatever he was doing was the most important thing in the world.

She went to the hospital, which was scary, and they tested for all sorts of things. She seemed pretty okay at first, but a couple days after she got home, she started feeling this numbness in her fingers. It comes and goes, but it comes more often now.

I got her to go to a lawyer. That was on me. She just wanted the insurance companies to talk to each other and fix her car. I told her, “Mom, your hands are numb, something’s wrong, and we don’t know the insurance companies will come through.”

We’ve had trouble with them before, the insurance companies, so that got her to listen to me. We went to a lawyer, who was nice enough to talk to us for free, and my mom described everything that happened, everything except the numb hands. I had to bring that up, and it clearly upset her when I did. She sort of folded her hands in her lap, and simultaneously looked down and glared at me.

The lawyer actually stopped writing when I said this. Which, I thought was what I wanted. I thought I wanted the big moment where he’d say there was something there for a case or whatever, but all the sudden I wanted nothing to do with it and I thought it was a bad idea.

Too late, though. He said he wanted us to go back to the doctor, that the law firm would cover the bill, and that he thought there was a case for serious injury.

This is where the definition part comes in because my mother said, “oh, it’s not serious.”

He tried to explain that it was, legally and medically. That it was serious, but she didn’t want to hear it. She just ran right out of that office. At home, she scolded me for the whole thing. I did notice, though, later that night, that she was looking at her hands again.

So, I need help with this definition. Does what my mom said sound like a “serious injury?” She doesn’t trust lawyers, especially this one for some reason, but if I could bring her evidence of other people saying it, she might be more willing to believe.

Honestly, I think she’s in denial, and she is just afraid to take thing farther. She wants it all to go away. I want it to go away too. But her hands are still numb, and I don’t want her to suffer if there’s a way to make them better and a way to get that bad driver to pay for it.

So, who out there is good with medicine or definition? Is what my mom has serious?

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