The Dangers of Childbirth

Nobody is a stranger to the wonders of childbirth. Indeed, a myriad of movies, songs, and works of literature all proclaim the incredible experience that is bringing life into the world. Unfortunately, even the most accomplished doctor cannot guarantee the health of an infant. Birth trauma can occur during the birthing process that may put the infant at risk to several medical complications. According to Mazin & Associates, PC, there are numerous causes of birth injuries. Size of the infant, presentation of infant during labor, and medical negligence are just a few factors that contribute to birth trauma. Premature and large infants are more likely to suffer from birth injuries. A breech birth or the delivery of a baby feet or buttocks first can also increase the likelihood of postnatal damage.

There are a variety of birth injuries, some more fatal than others. Newborn cervical fractures and facial paralysis are one of the most prevalent delivery related injuries. According to Nationwide Children’s, a narrow birth canal or use of medical instruments may cause pressure on the infant thereby fracturing its clavicle. A newborn fractured clavicle is evident through the baby’s actions. The baby may fuss and cry revealing sensitivity to the affected area. Often times, the child may hold the injured arm close to its side, an indication of the trauma. After several weeks, a lump will appear signifying the healing process. There is no treatment required for this medical condition although doctors as well as future parents take actions to ensure the child is comfortable. Another delivery related injury includes facial paralysis. During a difficult delivery, pressure to the facial nerve of the infant may occur. Such a trauma can contribute to medical condition called facial nerve palsy. As reported by U.S. National Library of Medicine, the infant may no longer possess voluntary muscle movement of the face. Paralysis of the affected side of the face or uneven facial presentation indicates the condition. In the best cases, because the paralysis wanes naturally, treatment is not required. In other cases, however, the infant may become permanently paralyzed, and thus require therapy.

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